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Washington
66

Washington State Parks

USA Parks
Washington
The Islands Region
Cama Beach State Park
Cama Beach State Park © Joe Mabel / CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Looking down to the historic Cama Beach Resort buildings, Cama Beach State Park, Washington state, U.S.
Cama Beach State Park © Janet Chambers
Cama Beach State Park © Joe Mabel / CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Rental cabins, some of the historic Cama Beach Resort buildings, Cama Beach State Park, Washington state, U.S.
Cama Beach State Park © Joe Mabel / CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Boathouse built c. 1950, one of the historic Cama Beach Resort buildings, Cama Beach State Park, Washington state, U.S. Now operated by the Seattle-based Center for Wooden Boats.
Cama Beach State Park © Lmm3181 / CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Cama Beach Resort
Cama Beach State Park © Joe Mabel / CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Rental cabins, some of the historic Cama Beach Resort buildings, Cama Beach State Park, Washington state, U.S.
CAMA BEACH STATE PARK
CAMA BEACH STATE PARK
1880 West Camano Drive
Camano, Washington   98282
(lat:48.1451 lon:-122.5094)

Phone: 360-387-1550
Reservations: 360-387-1550
Cama Beach State Park is on the southwest shore of Camano Island facing Saratoga Passage. Cama Beach offers visitors a chance to step back in time to a 1930s-era Puget Sound fishing resort complete with waterfront cedar cabins and bungalows. These have been refurbished, with modern conveniences added, and are available for rent year round to individuals and groups.

Within a 90-minute drive of Seattle, Cama Beach offers day and overnight visitors alike a time capsule experience. The historic fishing resort was a favorite summer getaway for families for more than 50 years. The area, used for centuries by Native Americans for fishing and hunting, looks out on sweeping views of the Sound, with Whidbey Island and the Olympic Mountains beyond.
History of the Area
For centuries, Native American people fished and hunted in the area. Starting in the mid-1800s, the region was used for logging. In the early 20th century, the island became more accessible with the advent of the automobile and a bridge between Camano Island and the mainland. Cottages and fishing resorts were built. Between 1934 and 1989, Muriel and Lee Risk operated a fishing resort at Cama. The Risk daughters took over the property in 1990, and shortly thereafter, discussions began about turning the property into a park.

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission began acquiring land through a combination of family donation and sale in 1994.

The vision of the park is to offer visitors a restful and relaxing getaway where they also can learn about tribal cultures and Native people's presence on the land. It is also about wooden boat building and maritime culture through the Center for Wooden Boats. Retreat and dining facilities are planned for the future.
Passes
A Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to Washington state parks for day use. For more information about the Discover Pass and exemptions, please visit the Discover Pass web page.
Park Store
Cama Beach Historical State Park features a park store at the north end of the waterfront cabins, just east of the historic gas pumps. As a busy fishing resort the store was the Social Hub - guests would stop in to buy their supplies and enjoy a visit with resort staff and old friends.

Today the park store is once again the hub of activity at the park. Visitors can purchase a variety of supplies at the store, including snacks, groceries and souvenirs. The store also has a lending library with books, games and toys for all guests to enjoy.

The store also is home of the Cama Beach Foundation, a non-profit organization with volunteers who are eager to answer questions about the park and help visitors enjoy their time at Cama Beach.
Cabins
Cama Beach cabins, deluxe cabins and a bungalow are available for rent to individuals and groups.

The standard cabins are each 14-by-20-feet in size with a living room, kitchen area, and bedroom. The 13 beachfront standard cabins have two double beds, one in the bedroom and one in the living space, and can accommodate up to four people. The 11 second-row standard cabins have one bunk bed with a double bed on the bottom and a twin bed on the top in the bedroom, plus a double bed and a twin bed in the living space second-row cabins can accommodate up to six people.

Cabin amenities include electric heat and lights, refrigerator with freezer, microwave oven, and sink. There is a contemporary bathhouse with restrooms and showers located directly behind the row of cabins. Linen service is not provided guests need to bring their own bedding, pillows, towels, cookware, dishes, and utensils.

The six deluxe cabins are each 14-by-28-feet in size with a living room, kitchen area, bedroom, and small bathroom with shower, toilet, and sink. These cabins have one double bed in the bedroom and a bunk bed with a double bed on the bottom and a twin bed on the top in the living space.

The 14-by-28-foot ADA-accessible deluxe cabin has a bunk bed with a double bed on the bottom and a twin bed on the top. This cabin does not have a separate bedroom.

Cabin amenities include electric heat and lights, refrigerator with freezer, microwave oven, and sink. All deluxe cabins are set above the beach with a fabulous view of the water. Linen service is not provided guests need to bring their own bedding, pillows, towels, cookware, dishes, and utensils.

Two, 20-by-28-foot beachside bungalows are available. Each boasts a good-size living room area, a kitchenette with full-size refrigerator/freezer, microwave oven, and sink. Both have a bathroom with shower, toilet, and sink. Each bungalow has two bunk-beds double bed on bottom, twin bed on top bungalow A has an additional twin-over-twin bunk bed and bungalow H has an additional double bed both bungalows will sleep up to eight people.

The ADA bungalow H has one bedroom while the non-ADA bungalow A has two. Linen service is not provided guests need to bring their own bedding, pillows, towels, cookware, dishes, and utensils. The large covered front porches face the beach and Saratoga Passage.
Nearby Vacation Rentals
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Trails
15 miles of hiking trails
Nature Programs
The Center for Wooden Boats offers toy boat building from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. each Saturday. Classes are free, however, a suggested donation of $5 is appreciated. Kids and family programs include painting and drawing nature scenes, Build-a-Bird, nature journaling, crafting tree-ring-ornaments and necklaces, creating baskets from natural materials, and many other activities for kids and adults of all ages.

From mid-June through Labor Day, programs are offered on many days throughout each week. Additional programs are offered on Mondays, Tuesdays and Sundays when presenters are available. Beach walks, Cama Beach Bingo and other activities led by naturalists are presented during the summer. Please check with the Historic Park Store for more information.

Visitor Comments, Memories and Reviews
October 22 by Judy
Cama Beach is perfect! I went there to begin healing from the loss of my son, with my best friend, Stella (my dog) The facilities were more than adequate in the midst of thick nature and water and peace. Thanks with all my heart.
July 15 The best! by GreenoL
I hate do even give up this great secret, but Cama Beach is awesome! Right on the water, clean, small, friendly! New bathrooms with showers and the cutest cabins ever! Stayed there the past 2 nights and loved it with our group of neighborhood moms and our kids. Thanks to Bob the shuttle driver...you were super!
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Directions
Cama Beach State Park is at 1880 S. West Camano Drive, Camano Island. The park is west of Stanwood and approximately 19 miles from the freeway.

To get there, take Exit 212 off I-5. Turn west on State Route 532 and drive 5.75 miles toward Stanwood/Camano Island. Once in Stanwood, continue west 4.5 miles to Y junction of East Camano and North Camano drives. Bear left onto East Camano Drive, which becomes Elger Bay Road. Just after Elger Bay Grocery, take a right onto Mountain View Drive. At the top of the hill, follow the road as it curves to the right and becomes West Camano Drive. The park entrance is approximately 1/2 mile beyond the curve and is on the left. Enter the gate on the right just inside the entrance and proceed to the park welcome station.

Washington
66

Washington State Parks

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