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USA Parks
USA Parks
Idaho
Idaho
Eastern Region
Eastern Region
Targhee National Forest
Targhee National Forest
TARGHEE NATIONAL FOREST
TARGHEE NATIONAL FOREST
P.O. Box 208
St. Anthony, Idaho   83445

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The majority of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest lies in eastern Idaho, western Wyoming, and northern Utah. Situated next to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, the Forest is home to a diverse number of wildlife and fish, including Threatened and Endangered species, wilderness, scenic panoramas and intensively managed forest lands.

The Forest lies almost entirely within "the Greater Yellowstone Area" or "the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem," an area of over 12 million acres and the largest remaining block of relatively undisturbed plant and animal habitat in the contiguous United States. The area continues to gain prominence for its ecological integrity. The United Nations has identified the area as a Biosphere Reserve.
FACILITIES AND ACTIVITIES OVERVIEW
Day-UseFishingyes
 Huntingyes
 Hiking Trailyes
 Picnickingyes
Boating
Floatboating & canoeing can be experienced in private boats or with commercial outfitters and guides. Floatboating is done on the Henrys (North) and South Forks of the Snake River and on Falls River. Several dangerous streches of rapids exist in both forks of the Snake River and impassable falls stop passage along the Henrys Fork and the Falls rivers. The Caribou-Targhee offers good canoeing waters through peaceful scenic wooded areas. At several points, however, large falls, dams, rapids and diversion canal intakes create dangerous obstacles that boaters need to be aware of. In the spring flood water create hazardous situations. No permits or fees are required for private parties. It is advisable for boaters to check with the nearest Forest Service offices for current information.
Fishing
Fishing:

Fishing in our lakes, rivers, and other waterways continues to be a favorite pastime of forest visitors. The Caribou-Targhee National Forest is home to scores of native fish.

State fishing licenses are required and can be obtained from a local state fish and game office or sporting goods store. Make sure that you use the permitted type of bait and fishing gear for the area you plan to fish. There may be a limit to the number, size, and kind of fish that you can keep. You can obtain a copy of the state regulations that cover these points at the time you get your license.

If you plan to use a boat or watercraft when fishing, check with your destination office to see what kind of watercraft is allowed there. Always adhere to cautions and procedures for cleaning your watercraft so that you don't promote the spread of non-native species to the next body of water you may visit with your boat. Use proper dumping stations instead of tossing refuse into the water.

Please follow all visitor rules and practice good safety when visiting the National Forest.




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Rock Climbing and Rappelling
Rock climbing, rappelling, mountaineering, and ice climbing are technical and unique ways to experience a National Forest. Forests and wilderness areas offer experiences that cater to every ability level; but, please don't climb or rappel in areas where it is not permitted. You may take a guided climb or simply hone your skills and have fun at a climbing wall. Climbing fees and seasonal restrictions vary from site to site. Check with your destination ahead of time for any restrictions that may be in place.
Trails
Throughout the Forest, hundreds of miles of trails are available during the summer for hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking and off-highway vehicle riding. Trails range from steep, rugged climbs to relatively flat paths blanketed in pine needles. Please don't use trails in areas where it is not permitted.

Most trails have some type of regulation, fee or seasonal restriction, so it's wise to find out more about the specific trail you wish to explore before showing up at the trailhead. Parking, horse unloading facilities, and comfort stations exist at most trailhead locations.

Many recreation sites include paved trails to provide wheelchair access. Guided hikes may also be available at some locations.

Use of Non-Motorized Trails is limited to hikers and horses, with some trails open to mountain bikes. Wilderness trails are closed to all types of motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, hang gliders, and bicycles. Trail hiking is an easy way to discover the great outdoors and is available to recreationists of almost any age and ability level.

Please follow all visitor rules and practice good safety when visiting the National Forest.

Hiking and Backpacking:

Throughout the Forest, hundreds of miles of trails are available during the summer for hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking and off-highway vehicle riding. Trails range from steep, rugged climbs to relatively flat paths blanketed in pine needles. Please don't use trails in areas where it is not permitted.

Most trails have some type of regulation, fee or seasonal restriction, so it's wise to find out more about the specific trail you wish to explore before showing up at the trailhead. Parking, horse unloading facilities, and comfort stations exist at most trailhead locations.

Many recreation sites include paved trails to provide wheelchair access. Guided hikes may also be available at some locations.

Use of Non-Motorized Trails is limited to hikers and horses, with some trails open to mountain bikes. Wilderness trails are closed to all types of motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, hang gliders, and bicycles. Trail hiking is an easy way to discover the great outdoors and is available to recreationists of almost any age and ability level.

Please follow all visitor rules and practice good safety when visiting the National Forest.
Visitor Comments, Memories and Reviews


Weather Forecast, (83433)

Directions
Visit our <A HREF="http://www.fs.fed.us/r4/caribou/Targhee/general.htm">location page</A> for help in getting here.

USA Parks
USA Parks
Idaho
Idaho
Eastern Region
Eastern Region
Targhee National Forest
Targhee National Forest